Interested in Hispanic Media? Advance your education
by taking the Hispanic Media Broadcasting Program.

  • On-camera training
  • Microphone & Voice Control Training
  • Radio and Television Promotions
  • Speech and Announcing Training
  • Production & Equipment Training
  • Online Media Training
  • News & Sports Writing and Reporting

What is the Hispanic Media Broadcasting Program?

The Hispanic Media Broadcasting program prepares an individual to gain entry-level employment in the broadcast industry. The student learns studio terms, legal requirements, broadcast station organization, AM-FM radio and TV station channel assignments, logging procedure, principles of performance, programming formats and a thorough examination of past and present radio and TV trends and development.

In addition to classroom periods, the students will be trained in professionally equipped audio and video studios leading to proficiency with consoles, analog and digital recording/playback decks, video camera operations and other production equipment. Students will also work in computer labs to learn online media training including web design, Content Management Systems and linked journalism. Studio lab work, both live and recorded, is also critiqued by professional broadcast announcers and producers.

Special lectures featuring prominent authorities on specific aspects of radio and television, such as broadcast law, labor unions, music promotions, etc. are also provided to the student. These lectures are important for entry-level positions as a disc jockey, newscaster, sportscaster, director, producer or salesperson.

Enrique Santos: Radio Personality of the Year



Topics Covered

The Hispanic Media Broadcasting program prepares students for the real world of broadcasting. Topics include:
  • Radio & TV terms
  • Legal requirements
  • Station organization
  • AM-FM radio & TV station channel assignments
  • Create a Program Log
  • Programming formats
  • A close look at past and present radio and TV trends and development
What is Pan? A Stop Set? An ADC? An Aircheck? It’s not just about learning how the technology works, a student must understand all the terminology that goes along with it. From day one, it’s critical students begin learning the language of their newly chosen career.
As with any industry, understanding the roles and responsibilities of each employee not only gives you a better idea of what jobs you’ll want to train for during the program, having this knowledge could give you another advantage during the interview process.
Why is your favorite Television or Radio Station on that Channel or Frequency? The difference between the strength of an AM station, and the reach of an FM station? Even if your career choice isn’t on the technical side, understanding the “science” of your industry could also give you an advantage during the interview process.
Every song, television show, or commercial airs at a specific time for a specific reason. Learning how to schedule for ratings is a valuable skill to acquire.
Why does one market have an oldies station, while another may have multiple jazz formats? Understanding the needs of the community a station serves can also help you choose where you may want to relocate if the situation presents itself.
Each of our Schools are located in cities with rich histories of broadcasting firsts. Learning about the successes of the past can lead to a better understanding of the current trends in the industry and what could be industry trends in the future.

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APPY